US invasion bluster Russia vows it will not initiate a war

US invasion bluster Russia vows it will not initiate a war

US invasion bluster Russia vows it will not initiate a war

  US invasion bluster Russia vows it will not initiate a war As Ukraine strives to temper US invasion bluster Russia vows it will not initiate a war           On Friday, Russia’s top ambassador vowed that the country would not go to war with Ukraine. However, with over 100,000 Russian troops stationed around the country’s borders, he added that Moscow will not be “ignored.”
“There will be no conflict if it is dependent on the Russian Federation,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov stated. “We don’t want wars, and we won’t stand by and let any body or group trampled on.”our interest
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US invasion bluster Russia vows it will not initiate a war

 

 

Despite warnings from the White House that Russia might invade Ukraine again in weeks, as it did in 2014, Moscow appeared to be pursuing a divide-and-conquer strategy, attempting to exploit any chink in the US-European allies’ armor. The latest salvo in Moscow’s and the West’s verbal war came in the shape of a backhanded praise.

 

 

As Ukraine strives to temper US invasion bluster, Russia vows it will not launch a conflict. On Friday, Russia’s top ambassador vowed that the country would not go to war with Ukraine. However, with over 100,000 Russian troops stationed around the country’s borders, he added that Moscow will not be “ignored. “If it is dependent on the Russian Federation, there will be no conflict,” said Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. “We don’t want conflicts, but we won’t let our interests be crushed.” whoever or whichever group

 

 

 

Russia’s attempt to divide

Despite warnings from the White House that Russia might invade Ukraine again in weeks, as it did in 2014, Moscow appeared to be pursuing a divide-and-conquer strategy, attempting to exploit any chink in the US-European allies’ armor. The latest salvo in Moscow’s verbal war with the West was a backhanded praise.
Lavrov praised the White House’s formal answer to Russian President Vladimir Putin’s requests that NATO move its troops back from Russia’s western borders and refuse new members. However, the adulation was given at the expense of NATO.

The American response seems almost like a model for diplomatic decency against the backdrop of the NATO paper that was delivered to us,” Lavrov said, criticizing NATO’s earlier response to Russia’s requests as “so ideological” that he was “a bit ashamed of people who authored these texts.”
It was a shot at the transatlantic security alliance led by the United States, which Putin sees as a danger to Russia’s power and influence in the region. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, Putin’s power has eroded, and he is keen to keep more ex-Soviet governments, like as Ukraine, out of NATO’s fold.

 

 

 

 

 

We’ll never let a potential opponent set the bar for when force is used. We’ll make sure we have the right forces in the right place at the right time to defend and protect all friends. #ACFrontPage

On Friday, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg stated that he would not risk informing any adversary of the exact “threshold” that would trigger a unified military response from the alliance, but that the alliance would “always be sure we have the necessary forces in the right place at the right time to defend and protect all allies, as we’ve done for more than 70 years.”
What is the level of danger?

 

 

 

President Joe Biden’s phone contact with his Ukrainian counterpart, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, on Thursday came on the heels of Russia’s thinly veiled attempt to infer division among its foes. Despite readouts from both Washington and Kyiv emphasizing the importance of unity, this call was made.

Mr. Biden’s administration’s emphasis on the danger of a Russian invasion appears to be causing some unease in Kiev.
According to a source familiar with the exchange, Zelenskyy requested that the US tone down its hyperbole about an impending invasion.
The White House dismissed as “absolutely false” allegations that Vice President Joe Biden had told Zelenskyy over the phone that Russian soldiers were “almost certain” to invade and “sack” the capital city.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Biden had instead told Zelenskyy that there was “a distinct chance” of an invasion in February, according to a National Security Council staffer in a tweet. “Anything more or different than that is entirely false.”

The White House, on the other hand, has been warning for weeks that Russia may invade as early as February. Russian attacks against Ukrainian command and control facilities, particularly those in the Kyiv area, have also been warned about by US and Ukrainian intelligence.
The Ukrainians’ main concern is that Putin may choose for less overt aggressions, including as smaller-scale border breaches or “false-flag” attacks, in order to accuse Ukraine’s military of escalation.
Any Russian strike, according to Kyiv, would almost certainly be preceded by cyberattacks on the country’s infrastructure, in order to sow chaos and undermine trust in Zelenskyy’s leadership. Putin has previously demonstrated that he prefers such techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

 

As Ukraine strives to temper US invasion bluster, Russia vows it will not launch a conflict.

Appeals for strategic calm

Despite the escalating tensions, Zelenskyy has urged Ukrainians to remain calm. His government understands that hysteria, such as people clearing grocery shelves or fleeing the nation, would be extremely unstable. It’s possible that this is exactly what Russia desires: Putin could try to use Ukraine’s turmoil to reinstall a pro-Russian government, according to British intelligence. Everything appeared to be normal on Friday in Kyiv’s streets. The serenity that has prevailed may be attributable to the fact that this is nothing new for Ukrainians: They’ve been surrounded by Russians for quite some time. for years of violence Since Putin’s forces invaded Ukraine in 2014 and annexed the Crimean Peninsula, a battle has raged in the east of the country between Ukrainian forces and Russian-backed separatists.

 

 

 

 


According to Kyiv, the conflict had already taken over 14,000 deaths before Russia’s deployment of tens of thousands of troops to the border region over the last year heightened tensions. Moscow claims the troops and weapons are merely there for training exercises, that they pose no threat to Russia’s neighbors, and that it has complete control over its military on Russian soil.

CBS News was at the Maidan almost precisely eight years ago, covering enormous anti-Russian protests. The protestors were shot by state security personnel, and the square was littered with their bodies.
Ukrainian politics’ pro-Russian factions haven’t vanished; they’ve simply been voted out of power. Putin could try to take advantage of any opportunity to reinstall sympathetic figures in Kyiv, Zelenskyy understands.
Clearly, opinions on what Putin intends to do differ in Ukraine, the United States, and other NATO countries. However, Ukraine’s leadership is well aware of the threat, and it is working hard to avoid falling into a trap and causing panic among the country’s 45 million people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pressure and diplomacy

The ball is now in Russia’s court, according to the United States. Putin’s answer to the US and NATO’s responses to his requests is still being formulated. He spoke with French President Emmanuel Macron on Friday, and French officials said they agreed that the situation needed to be de-escalated and that talks should continue.
Time is running out for the Biden administration to negotiate a diplomatic solution to the issue. In an effort to put further pressure on Russia, the US has requested a public conference at the United Nations to present its case.

 

 

 

 

The United States has requested an open meeting of the United Nations Security Council on Monday — a day before Russia takes over the rotating presidency of the council and thus gets to set its agenda — to discuss what US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield has described as Russia’s “threat behavior.”
According to Thomas-Greenfield, world powers must consider “what is at stake for Ukraine, Russia, Europe, and the international order if Russia continues to invade Ukraine.”
The public meeting was scheduled for Monday at 10 a.m. Eastern.

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