Finland is close to submitting an application to join NATO Here’s why this is bad news for Putin

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Finland is close to submitting an application to join NATO Here’s why this is bad news for Putin   Finland is on the verge of submitting an application to join NATO. Listed below are the reasons why this is terrible news for Putin.

 

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The invasion of Ukraine by Russian President Vladimir Putin has backfired on a number of fronts. Nonetheless, one of the most devastating outcomes for the Russian President has been the increasingly realistic likelihood of Finland joining NATO.
After the Foreign Affairs Committee develops a response to the government’s security report — which includes the option of joining NATO — the Nordic nation is anticipated to express its interest in joining the alliance as early as this week. Following that, the Finnish parliament will undertake an unusual debate on whether or not to endorse the recommendations made by the security report.
At this point, it is quite likely that NATO will extend an invitation to the country to discuss membership in the alliance.

 

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Finland is close to submitting an application to join NATO Here’s why this is bad news for Putin

 

 

It is widely assumed that this would occur relatively fast because Finland already fits the most of the criteria and because it is highly unlikely that any NATO countries would disagree.

Several recent opinion polls have revealed that at least 60 percent of Finns now support NATO membership, representing a significant increase from the previous high of roughly 30 percent in prior years.
If everything goes according to plan, this country with a population of less than 6 million people will have reshaped the security map of Europe in a way that was previously unthinkable, with potentially devastating ramifications for Russia.

 

 

Prior to his invasion of Ukraine, Putin made it clear that he believed NATO had become too close to Russia and that the alliance should be re-established along the lines of the 1990s, before those nations that either bordered Russia or were former Soviet republics joined the military alliance.

According to the alliance, Russia now shares a land border with five NATO members totaling approximately 755 miles. As a result of Finland’s admission, a country with which Russia shares an 800-mile border would become formally linked with the United States on military matters.
While the admission of Finland to NATO would be terrible news for the Kremlin, the alliance as a whole would benefit from the move. Finnish military might has long been unofficially associated with the West despite the country’s small population. Despite its small population, Finland is a significant military force. Its military has for decades relied on equipment purchased from the United States that is compatible with NATO countries, allowing it to easily participate in NATO missions if it so chooses.

 

NATO’s influence in northern Europe would be extended all the way up to the Arctic, an area that is becoming increasingly important geopolitically as a result of the region’s abundant natural resources, strategic location, and a slew of territorial claims, including those asserted by Russia, Finland, and the United States.
Sweden, which borders Finland on the western side and is considering joining the alliance — and Finland’s admission would make it even more possible, given that the two nations have been on a similar path to joining since the outbreak of the Ukraine crisis.

 

Survivalism is a way of thinking.

Numerous observers feel that the sole reason Finland didn’t join the alliance prior to the Ukraine crisis was a matter of pragmatic considerations.
Finnish security has always been predicated on two concepts: first, geography and history; second, idealism and realism, according to former Finnish Prime Minister Alexander Stubb, who spoke to CNN about the country’s security history.
“In an ideal scenario, we would like to collaborate with Russia, which we cannot avoid due to the fact that it is our geographical neighbor. However, we also know from history that Russia is the most serious and realistic threat to our national security today. In recent years, the reality that Russia is willing to cause greater disruption in our neighborhood has become even more apparent, and thus joining NATO has become the most logical course of action “he explained.

 

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Finland has historically managed these contradictory realities by simultaneously assuaging Russia’s security worries, no matter how illogical they may be, while also maintaining strong defense spending and a standing military that is compatible with its Western allies and neighbors.
“The idea that a Western country would invade Russia has always seemed absurd, but we have attempted to mitigate those concerns by increasing trade and cooperating in other areas,” said Charly Salonius-Pasternak, a leading researcher in global security at the Finnish Institute of International Affairs. “We have tried to minimize those concerns by boosting trade and cooperating in other areas,” she added.
On top of policies such as conscription — under which all Finnish men are subject to being called up for military service — and heavy defense spending, he argues, Finnish politicians have continuously sold the people on the idea that Finland’s idealistic way of life must be preserved at any costs.

 

“Finland’s default ideology has been one of survival since the country’s founding. In the last 100 years, we have developed into a powerful, independent country with great living standards. To keep the peace, we have had to make sacrifices in terms of land “Salonius-Pasternak made the statement. The preservation of our way of life, whether through pragmatic diplomacy or by taking a more aggressive posture against our greatest threat, is therefore critical.
There is no doubt that Finland joining NATO would be a big setback for Russian President Vladimir Putin. As well as providing an additional 800 miles of shared border with the alliance, it would also serve as a symbolic step forward in consolidating the anti-Putin coalition that has formed since the invasion of Ukraine. Country after country that was once neutral is now supplying Ukraine with finance and weapons, and Putin is becoming an international pariah with fewer and fewer allies by the day.

 

Russian retaliation
Of course, there are fears about how Russia would react if Finland expresses a desire to become a member of the NATO alliance.
Previously serving as Finland’s assistant chief of defense intelligence, Martti Kari told CNN that Russia had already begun a disinformation campaign against the country. “The basic premise is that Finland is a Nazi country, because we fought alongside Nazi Germany against [the] Soviet Union during the Second World War,” he explained.
The president anticipates that Russia would violate Finland’s airspace and impede its maritime activities, particularly shipping. He also believes that Russia will step up its intelligence efforts against the nation.
The Norwegian Defence University College’s assistant professor Hkon Lunde Saxi believes that any step toward Finnish NATO membership would “likely result in a Russian military buildup along NATO’s new border with Russia, which would in and of itself be detrimental to Finnish or European security.”

 

 

He is of the opinion, however, that the benefits would outweigh any “potential negative effects of a somewhat greater Russian military footprint along Finland’s border.”

As for what would happen during the interim period, in which Finland would not be protected by NATO membership but would be in the midst of membership negotiations, multiple officials have told CNN that they expect members of the alliance, particularly the United Kingdom and the United States, to guarantee Finnish security throughout the process.
Of all, nothing is guaranteed until Finland takes the first step and declares its intention to join the European Union. The fact that Putin’s attempt to reduce NATO’s influence in Europe has garnered widespread public support, political support, and the fact that Russia has provided every reason for another of its neighbors to join its hated rival, there is little doubt that Putin’s gambit has backfired spectacularly.

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