HOW TO DRIVE MANUAL / AUTOMATIC

   HOW TO DRIVE MANUAL / AUTOMATIC The basic concepts of starting and shifting through the gears is a manageable process for just about anyone. To drive a manual, you’ll need to familiarize yourself with the clutch, become comfortable with the gearstick, and practice starting, stopping, and shifting gears at various driving speeds.

 

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START ON LEVEL GROUND WITH THE CAR OFF.:-

Especially if this is your first time driving a car with a manual transmission, start slowly and methodically. Put your seat belt on once you sit down. While learning, it can be useful to roll down the windows. This helps you hear the sound of the engine revolving and to shift gears accordingly. The pedal on the left is the clutch, the middle one is the brake, and the accelerator is on the right (remember it, from left to right, as C-B-A). This layout is the same for both left-hand drive and right-hand drive vehicles.

 

 

 

HOW TO DRIVE MANUAL / AUTOMATIC

 

 

LEARN WHAT THE CLUTCH DOES:- Before you start pushing down on this unfamiliar pedal on the left, take a moment to figure out the basics of its function.The clutch disengages the engine from the wheels. When one or both are spinning, the clutch allows you to switch gears without grinding the teeth of each separate gear.

 

 

Before you change gears (either to move up or down), the clutch must be depressed (pushed).

 

EXPERT TIP

When you’re learning to drive a manual car, the most common mistake is that you take the clutch too fast and the car stalls out.

 

ADJUST THE SEAT POSITION SO YOU CAN ACCESS THE CLUTCH PEDAL’S FULL RANGE OF MOTION:- Slide forward enough to allow you to press the clutch pedal (the left pedal, next to the brake pedal) fully to the floor with your left foot.

 

 

 

PRESS THE CLUTCH PEDAL AND HOLD IT TO THE FLOOR:- This would also be a good time to take note of how the travel of the clutch pedal differs from that of the brake and gas. It’s also a good opportunity to get used to slowly and steadily releasing the clutch pedal.

If you’ve only ever driven automatic cars, it might feel awkward to use your left foot to push a pedal. With practice, you’ll get used to using both feet in concert.

 

 

 

MOVE THE GEARSTICK INTO NEUTRAL:- This is the middle position that feels free when moved from side to side. The vehicle is considered out of gear when:

  • The gearstick is in the neutral position, and/or
  • The clutch pedal is fully depressed.
  • Don’t try to use the gearstick without having the clutch pedal depressed, because it simply won’t work.

 

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START THE ENGINE WITH THE KEY IN THE IGNITION, MAKING SURE THE GEAR STICK IS STILL IN NEUTRAL:- Make sure the handbrake is on before starting the car, especially if you are a novice.[6]

Some cars will start up in neutral without the clutch depressed, but some newer cars will not.

REMOVE YOUR FOOT FROM THE CLUTCH PEDAL WITH THE CAR STILL IN NEUTRAL:- If you’re on level ground, you should remain stationary; you’ll start rolling if you’re on a hill. If you’re ready to move on to actually driving, make sure to release the handbrake (if it’s engaged) before you drive off.

 

PRESS THE CLUTCH TO THE FLOOR AND MOVE THE GEARSTICK INTO FIRST GEAR:- It should be the upper-left position, and there should be some kind of visual layout of the gear pattern on top of the gearstick. Gear patterns can vary, so take some time beforehand to study your car’s gear layout. You may want to practice shifting through the various gears with the engine switched off (and the clutch engaged).

 

 

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SLOWLY LIFT YOUR FOOT UP FROM THE CLUTCH PEDAL:-Continue until you hear the engine speed begin to drop, then push it back in. Repeat this several times until you can instantly recognize the sound. This is the friction point. When you’re shifting gears to start or keep moving, this is the point at which you’ll want to have the accelerator depressed enough to provide power.

LET UP ON THE CLUTCH WHILE PUSHING DOWN ON THE ACCELERATOR:-In order to get moving, lift your left foot up from the clutch pedal until the RPMs drop slightly. At the same instant, apply light pressure to the accelerator with your right foot. Balance the light downward pressure on the accelerator with slowly releasing pressure on the clutch pedal.

You will probably have to do this several times to find the right combination of up and down pressure. Another way of doing it; is to release the clutch until the point the engine revs down a little, and then applying pressure on the accelerator as the clutch engages. At this point the car will start to move.

It is best to have the engine rev just enough to prevent stalling as the clutch pedal is let up. This process may be a little difficult at first because you are new to the extra pedal in a manual car. Release the clutch fully (that is, slowly remove your foot from the pedal) once you start moving forward under control in first gear.

EXPECT TO STALL AT LEAST A FEW TIMES WHEN YOU’RE FIRST STARTING OUT. IF YOU RELEASE THE CLUTCH TOO QUICKLY THE ENGINE WILL STALL:-.

 

If the engine sounds like it is going to stall, hold the clutch where it is or push down a bit further. If you do stall, depress the clutch fully, apply the handbrake, put the car in neutral, switch the engine off and restart the car as normal. Don’t panic.Revving the engine while the clutch is between fully up and fully depressed will wear out the clutch parts prematurely, resulting in slippage or smoking of the clutch parts at the transmission. This is called riding the clutch and should be avoided.

 

RECOGNIZE WHEN IT’S TIME TO SHIFT UP TO A HIGHER GEAR:- When your RPM reaches about 2500 to 3000 while the car is in motion, it is time to shift to the next gear — for example, second gear if you are currently in first. The actual RPMs at which shifting is required will vary by the car you are driving, however. Your engine will begin to race and speed up, and you must learn to recognize this noise. Depress the clutch pedal until it disengages and guide the gearstick straight down from first gear into the bottom-left position (which is second gear in most configurations).Some cars have a “Shift Light” or indications on the tachometer that will tell you when you need to shift, so you don’t rev the engine too fast.

PUSH DOWN ON THE ACCELERATOR VERY SLIGHTLY AND SLOWLY RELEASE THE CLUTCH PEDAL:- Shifting gears in motion is the same as shifting into first from a stationary position. It’s all about listening, looking, and feeling for the engine’s cues and getting the up-and-down timing of your feet on the pedals correct. Keep practicing and you’ll get the hang of it.

Once in gear and on the accelerator, you should completely remove your foot from the clutch pedal. Resting your foot on the clutch pedal is a bad habit, as it applies pressure to the clutch mechanism — and the increased pressure will cause the clutch to wear out prematurely.

SHIFT DOWN INTO A LOWER GEAR AS YOU SLOW DOWN:- If you are going too slow for the current gear you’re in, your car will shudder as if it’s about to stall. To shift down gears while in motion, follow the same process of depressing the clutch and releasing the accelerator, shifting gears (say, from third to second), and letting off the clutch while depressing the accelerator.

 

COME TO A COMPLETE STOP:- To come to a stop in a fully controlled manner, shift down gradually until you reach first gear. When it’s time to come to a complete stop, move your right foot from the accelerator to the brake pedal and press down as much as is required. As you slow to about 10 mph (16 km/h), the car will be on the verge of shaking and vibrating. Press the clutch pedal fully down and move the gearstick into neutral to prevent stalling the car. Use the brake pedal to stop completely. You can also stop while in any gear by depressing the clutch fully and using the brake while shifting into neutral. This should only be done when you need to stop quickly, though, as it puts you in less control of the vehicle.

 

PRACTICE ON AN EASY COURSE WITH AN EXPERIENCED MANUAL DRIVER:- While you can legally practice alone on any public road with a valid driver’s license, you will pick up the nuances of driving a manual car faster if you have an experienced driver accompanying you. Start off in a flat, isolated area like a large (and empty) car park, then move on to quiet suburban streets. Drive around the same circuit repeatedly until you start to remember the various skills involved

AVOID STOPPING AND STARTING ON STEEP HILLS INITIALLY:-When you’re new to driving a manual, plan routes that avoid traffic lights at the top of steep hills. Your timing and coordination in working the gear stick, clutch, brake, and accelerator needs to be fairly sharp in order to avoid drifting backwards when you shift into first gear.You need to be able to quickly (but smoothly) move your right foot from releasing the brake to depressing the accelerator, while at the same time letting out the clutch. You can use the parking brake to limit backward drifting if necessary, but always remember to disengage it as you start moving forward.

LEARN PARKING PROCEDURES, ESPECIALLY ON HILLS:- Unlike automatics, manual transmission cars don’t have a “park” gear. But, simply putting the car in neutral opens the possibility of your car rolling freely, especially if parked on an incline or decline. Always use the handbrake, but don’t rely on it alone to keep your car in place whilst parked.

  • If you are parked facing uphill, shut the car off in neutral, then shift into first gear and apply the parking brake. If facing downhill, do the same but shift into reverse. This will prevent the wheels from rolling in the direction of the slope.
  • On extreme inclines, or simply to be extra cautious, you can also place chocks (angled blocks) behind your wheels to prevent movement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOP COMPLETELY BEFORE CHANGING FROM FORWARD TO REVERSE (AND VICE VERSA:- Making a complete stop when changing directions is an easy way to reduce your likelihood of causing expensive damage to your gearbox.It is strongly recommended to stop completely before going from reverse to first gear. However, it is possible on most manual transmissions to shift into first or possibly second when the car is moving backwards at a slow speed, but it is not recommended as this can cause excessive wear on the clutch.

 

In some cars, reverse gear has a lock out mechanism to prevent you for engaging it accidentally. Before using the reverse gear, make sure you know about this locking mechanism and how to disengage it before selecting reverse.

 

HOW TO DRIVE A CAR WITH AN AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION

Cars with automatic transmissions are very popular for both new and experienced drivers, as they are generally simpler to operate than manual transmissions and can be more comfortable for long trips. These simple steps will guide you in learning to operate an automatic transmission, but remember: before operating any motor vehicle, please make sure you have a valid driver’s license and understand all local traffic laws.

 

PREPARING TO DRIVE

 

 

Get into your car. Unlock the vehicle with a clicker or key and climb into the driver’s side.

 

Adjust the car to your needs. Adjust your seat in any direction you are able to/find necessary so that you can comfortably reach any controls and see well out of windows. Move the mirrors so you can see behind and to the sides of the vehicle clearly. Identify the car’s blind spots before you start driving so that you can check them before making any turns or lane changes.

Identify the controls. It essential to find the accelerator and brake pedals, the steering wheel, the gear selector lever, the light controls, the defroster, and the windshield wipers before you begin.

 

The brake and accelerator pedals are located at the bottom front of the area where your feet are. The brake pedal is on the left, the accelerator is on the right.

 

The steering wheel is the large wheel in the center of the driver’s console. Turn it to the left and right to turn the wheels of the vehicle.

 

Located on the steering column (usually on the left side) is a small lever that has a rest position in the middle and two locking positions above and below. This is the turn signal. Often on the left side of the steering wheel mounted into the console or a knob on one of the levers on the steering column is the control which turns the headlights on and off.

 

The gear selector lever will usually be in one of two places: it is either mounted to the right side of the steering column or in-between the driver’s and passenger’s seats. It will have a display showing gear indicators, usually marked with the letters “P”, “R”, “N”, and “D” and a few numbers. On steering-column shifting levers, this display is usually located on the instrument panel, underneath the speedometer.

Fasten your seat belt. Ensure that you and any passengers in your vehicle are wearing seat belts at all times.

 

PART 2

Operating the Vehicle in “Drive”

 

Start the car. Place your right foot on the brake pedal and push it down, then insert the key and turn it clockwise to start the vehicle.

 

Select your gear. Keep your foot on the brake pedal and shift the gear lever into “Drive.” This gear is marked with a “D” on the display panel, and will be highlighted when you’ve successfully selected it.[3]

For shift levers mounted on the steering column, pull the lever towards you before moving it up and down to select a gear.

For shift levers mounted on the floor, there is usually a side button to unlock the lever. It can then be moved along its track into position.

 

Release the parking brake. This is either a lever between the two front seats or a pedal on the far left side of the foot area. There may be a release lever above the lower parking brake or a button to push on the topside model before you can disengage it.

 

Check your surroundings. Look all around the car, including blind spots, to see if there are any moving objects or beings in the vicinity. Make sure to keep your eyes mainly on the direction you’re moving.

Get your car moving. Slowly release pressure on the brake pedal and the car will start to move slowly. Take your foot off the brake, use the same foot to press the gas pedal gently, and the car will begin to move faster. There is no need to change gears in relation to speed in regular road driving.

Turn the steering wheel to turn the car. In “drive,” turn it to the left to turn the car left and turn it to the right to turn the car right.

 

Apply the brakes to slow or stop the car. Take your right foot off the accelerator pedal and move it to the brake, applying gradual pressure so as not to jerk to a halt. When you wish to start again, switch your foot back to the accelerator.

 

Park the car. When you have reached your destination, bring the vehicle to a complete stop by applying gradual pressure to the brake pedal and slide the shift lever back into the “P” position. Turn off the engine by turning the key counter-clockwise. Don’t forget to turn off the headlights and apply the parking brake before getting out of the car.

 

PART 3

Operating Alternative Gears

 

Travel in Reverse. If you need to travel backward, make sure the vehicle is at a complete stop before changing gears in or out of “reverse.” Slide the gear shift to select the gear marked “R” and check behind/ around you for any possible obstructions. Gently remove your foot from the brake and place it on the accelerator.

 

When turning in Reverse, your car will turn in the same direction that you turn the wheel. You’re just going backwards, so the end of the car will swing in that direction, rather than the front.[4]

Use “neutral.” The “neutral” gear is only to be used when you have no need to control the speed of your car, not when driving regularly. Examples of this include when idling parked for a short time or when being pushed/towed.

 Use the lower gears. The gears marked “1,” “2,” and “3” are known as lower gears. These can work as a sort of in-engine brake system when you need to save your actual brakes. Going down steep hills is a good use of this technique. 1st gear, however, is only to be used when you must go very slowly. There is no need to stop when shifting between these gears and Drive.

 

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